Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Bücher, DVDs, Dokumentationsfilme...

Moderatoren: BassSultan, MartiAri

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 04.02.2015 14:15

Ich denke für diese Frauen war es wichtig ihre Tätowierungen zu verstecken. Darum diese konzentration um Intimbereich. Die konnten damit sogar baden gehen. Die alten Bikinis hätten das locker verdeckt. :mrgreen:
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon n8ght » 04.02.2015 23:28

Logisch.

Ich habe letztens mit Freunden von meinem Vater über das Thema Tattoos gesprochen und habe erzählt, dass es z.B. Fotos aus den 20er oder so gibt, auf denen man Frauen mit einem Bodysuite sieht, welcher aber durch die damalige Kleidung komplett verdeckt werden konnte. Das konnten die gar nicht glauben. Ich glaube, ich schicke ihnen mal dieses Foto - da fallen die wahrscheinlich vom Glauben ab. :mrgreen:
K-ink-Man hat geschrieben:Alle Informationen sind (versteckt in einer immensen Menge von Quark) jederzeit verfügbar!
Benutzeravatar
n8ght
 
Beiträge: 9000
Registriert: 26.05.2007 19:03
Wohnort: Köln

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 26.07.2015 0:17

also, der alte ötzi lässt sich nicht einfach so vom thron stoßen. der junge chinchorro kein sein schnurbart einpacken. :mrgreen:

Branislav K. hat geschrieben:MYTH BUSTING TATTOO (ART) HISTORY | Lars Krutak

http://larskrutak.com/myth-busting-tattoo-art-history/

August 23, 2013.

Let’s finally set the record straight…One of the longest running myths about tribal, non-Western tattooing is that it was “brought” to Europe and the West by sailors associated with Captain Cook’s voyages to Oceania. This is not true, of course, since there have been indigenous forms of tattooing practiced in Europe since the Neolithic (think Iceman) and onwards through time (Bosnian Catholics and Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land, etc.) prior to Cook’s return.

Another longstanding myth that continues to be perpetuated in the popular press, academic literature, and recent academic conferences I have attended is that of the Painted Prince Giolo (“Jeoly”), who several authors have posited was the “first recorded tattooed person to be exhibited in England” (Putzi 2006:14) or the “first…in Europe” (DeMello 2000:47). Prince Giolo was purchased in the Philippines by William Dampier in 1691 and brought to England for display in a money-making venture. His home island was recorded as the Spice Island of “Meangis” (today’s Miangis Island), located less than one hundred miles approximately due east of the southern coast of Mindanao.

Over the years, Jeoly has been described as a “Visayan” (Ellis 2008:189) and especially a “Marquesan” (Scutt and Gotch 1974:152), because his “pattern of tattooing…is similar to designs recorded in the Marquesas in the nineteenth century” (Barnes 2006:39 citing Scutt and Gotch).

But are these aforementioned facts legitimate or the stuff of legends?

In 1566, a tattooed Canadian Inuit woman and her unmarked child were kidnapped by French sailors in Labrador and brought to Antwerp in The Netherlands. Here, they were put on display in 1567 for money at a local tavern and handbills survive documenting the sad event. This woman was the first tattooed Native North American drawn from life (Sturtevant 1980), a fact that busts another widely perpetuated tattoo myth. For example, many past and contemporary writers (too many to enumerate here) have wrongly identified John White as the creator of the “earliest” portraits of tattooed Native North Americans (1590), Algonquian-speaking peoples he encountered in coastal North Carolina in the late sixteenth century.

Whilst I must confess that Antwerp is not in England (!), Martin Frobisher captured two Inuit in 1577 and brought them to England for display. One of his captives was a tattooed woman from Baffin Island who was later illustrated by John White. Therefore, it seems that there were at least two Indigenous tattooed people exhibited in Europe prior to the Painted Prince’s arrival in 1691.

Of course, anyone with knowledge of Micronesian and Marquesan tattooing practices and styles would tell you, as Tricia Allen (1991) did long ago, that Jeoly wore Micronesian tattoos that closely resembled those from the Caroline Islands. However, I would like to add that elements of Jeoly’s tattoos closely match those documented for men inhabiting the Palauan island of Merir (see Kotondo 1928) and other isles in the Sonsorol group, islands that lie approximately 400 nautical miles due east of Miangis.

hasebe_micro_1928_1 12

Now back to the Visayans. As evinced from illustrations in the Boxer Codex (ca. 1595), Visayan tattooing is quite dissimilar as compared to Jeoly’s Micronesian bodysuit. Although little information survives regarding the tattooing practices of the so-called Visayan “Pintados” (“painted” or “tattooed people”), Visayan tattooists were male, unlike their predominately female counterparts working in Palau and the Carolines, and Jeoly told Dampier that “one of his wives painted [tattooed] him.”

Concerning the “Marquesan” attribution of Jeoly’s tattoos, I think the greatest fault does not lie with Scutt and Gotch. Rather, it lies with those subsequent researchers who, many years later, continue to cite them – despite the data available to them – thereby failing to question the original analysis. (I should also note here that Marquesan tattooists were male, not female as in Jeoly’s case.)

Oh, and speaking of the most widely perpetuated (and recent) tattoo history myth of all…As of 2013, archaeological evidence indicates that the earliest form of human tattooing does not appear on the mummified corpse of the 5,300-year-old European Iceman. Instead, the oldest evidence appears as a 7000-year-old indelible mustache on the upper lip of a male mummy of the prehistoric Chinchorro culture of Chile, South America (Allison 1996:127; Krutak 2007:243). So my friends, cosmetic tattoos have been around for a very long time, demonstrating that the human desire to adorn the skin is indeed a very ancient tradition.

Literature Cited

Allen, T. 1991. “European Explorers and Marquesan Tattooing: The Wildest Island Style.” Pp. 86-101 in Tattootime: Art from the Heart (D.E. Hardy, ed.). Honolulu: Hardy Marks Publications.

Allison, J.M. “Early Mummies from Coastal Peru and Chile.” Pp. 125-130 in The Man in Ice, vol. 3, Human Mummies, A Global Survey of Their Status and the Techniques of Conservation (K. Spindler, H. Wilfring, E. Rastbichler-Zissernig, D. zur Nedden, H. Nothdurfter, eds.). Vienna: Springer.

Barnes, G. 2006. “Curiosity, Wonder, and William Dampier’s Painted Prince.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 6(1):31-50.

DeMello, M. 2000. Bodies of Inscription: A Cultural History of the Modern Tattoo Community. Durham: Duke University Press.

Ellis, J. 2008. Tattooing the World: Pacific Designs in Print & Skin. New York: Columbia University Press.

Kotondo, H. 1928. “The Tattooing of the Western Micronesians.” The Journal of the Anthropological Society of Tokyo XLIII (483-494):129-152.

Krutak, L. The Tattooing Arts of Tribal Women. London: Bennett & Bloom.

Putzi, J. 2006. Identifying Marks: Race, Gender and the Marked Body in Nineteenth-Century America. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Scutt, R. and C. Gotch. 1974. Skin Deep: The Mystery of Tattooing. London: Peter Davies.

Sturtevant, W.C. 1980. “The First Inuit Depiction by Europeans.” Études/Inuit/Studies 4(1-2):47-49.


UPDATE

http://larskrutak.com/what-is-the-oldes ... y-22-2015/

I will be the first to admit that I have made mistakes before in my research, but I need to correct this one because it’s a BIGGY! Back in 2013 on my blog (also see Krutak 2007:243, fn. 1), I cited a particular publication from a respected scientist (Allison 1996:127) who wrote that the oldest evidence of tattooing in the world came from a ~6000-year-old South American mummy of the Chinchorro culture. This cosmetic-like tattooing, which resembled a kind of ‘mustache,’ predated – or so it seemed! – the 5200-year-old body marks of the European Iceman.

Today, I was working with esteemed colleagues – prehistoric archaeologist Aaron Deter-Wolf (USA), tattooing technology expert Benoît Robitaille (Canada), and anthropologist Sébastien Galliot (France) – via an epic Facebook exchange to review some obscure papers about the Chinchorro find. And to our surprise we rediscovered that the mummy bearing the ‘mustache’ was radiocarbon dated to 3830 ± 100 BP (Arriaza 1994:19) or ~1800 BC. Why the date was misreported in 1996 begs some answers, but as Deter-Wolf pointed out it is probably linked to a typo: “BP” vs. “BC.” Indeed, if Mr. Mustache dated to 3830 BC he would bear the world’s oldest tattoos.

So Europe, you hold the tattoo title after all! But Mr. Mustache holds steady at #2…


BP
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Before_Present
Dateianhänge
10505082_1024830380875661_4158521526607625618_o.jpg
10505082_1024830380875661_4158521526607625618_o.jpg (127.29 KiB) 8256-mal betrachtet
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 12.04.2017 21:46

traditionelle kroatische tätowierungen. hier hats einen klick gemacht. nach 8 jahren kommen die ersten sleevs. und auch öfters half sleevs, bezeichne ich das jetzt mal so - mehrere tätowierungen am unterarm und hand. das ist eine entwicklung die ich mir gewunscht habe. die motive sind nicht immer traditionell, sondern individuel angepasst, geändert, neo-traditionell. auch in kombinationen mit motiven aus anderen kulturen. eine entwicklung die ich still beobachte und nicht beeinflussen versuche. auf facebook sind jetzt über 13 000 mitglieder. persönlich kenne ich niemand von diesen tätowierten menschen. aber das wird auch eines tages kommen.
Dateianhänge
15055888_1412246572120669_1857395085542098687_n.jpg
15055888_1412246572120669_1857395085542098687_n.jpg (94.55 KiB) 6290-mal betrachtet
13879263_1339351662759937_1194004715522079755_n.jpg
13879263_1339351662759937_1194004715522079755_n.jpg (51.21 KiB) 6290-mal betrachtet
17342837_1588797147815386_5214596355913913194_n.jpg
17342837_1588797147815386_5214596355913913194_n.jpg (49.06 KiB) 6290-mal betrachtet
14102291_1358562240838879_8907172243228236715_n.jpg
14102291_1358562240838879_8907172243228236715_n.jpg (120.04 KiB) 6290-mal betrachtet
13043335_1211876992157629_5196949965949330744_n.jpg
13043335_1211876992157629_5196949965949330744_n.jpg (94.71 KiB) 6290-mal betrachtet
Zuletzt geändert von Branislav K. am 12.04.2017 21:53, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 12.04.2017 21:50

hier noch mehr bilder:
Dateianhänge
13043375_1267850053243432_5706026330404943738_n.jpg
13043375_1267850053243432_5706026330404943738_n.jpg (39.62 KiB) 6282-mal betrachtet
13087665_1267840209911083_1480177437488554708_n.jpg
13087665_1267840209911083_1480177437488554708_n.jpg (11.21 KiB) 6282-mal betrachtet
16406613_1535030383192063_8569454565565857322_n.jpg
16406613_1535030383192063_8569454565565857322_n.jpg (52.17 KiB) 6287-mal betrachtet
16708564_1547187261959932_2469953685655794827_n.jpg
16708564_1547187261959932_2469953685655794827_n.jpg (51.11 KiB) 6287-mal betrachtet
16865068_1561962260482432_875479443973083396_n.jpg
16865068_1561962260482432_875479443973083396_n.jpg (94.47 KiB) 6287-mal betrachtet
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon MartiAri » 12.04.2017 22:06

Schöne Sachen dabei ... Simpel aber trotzdem sehr sehr schön anzusehen und im Gesamten auch immer echt stimmig!
Coffee keeps e busy until its time to be drunk
https://www.instagram.com/veganes_mettigelchen/
https://www.facebook.com/marvin.martian.127
Benutzeravatar
MartiAri
Moderator
 
Beiträge: 1426
Registriert: 26.04.2014 21:44
Wohnort: Dresden

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon n8ght » 13.04.2017 0:13

Cool!

Magst du die Facebook-Gruppe verlinken oder gibt es Gründe, das nicht zu tun?
K-ink-Man hat geschrieben:Alle Informationen sind (versteckt in einer immensen Menge von Quark) jederzeit verfügbar!
Benutzeravatar
n8ght
 
Beiträge: 9000
Registriert: 26.05.2007 19:03
Wohnort: Köln

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 13.04.2017 1:55

klar.
https://www.facebook.com/Traditional-Cr ... 247770680/

edit.
mir ist aufgefallen, die inuit tätowierungen werden wiederbelebt. wunderschöne motiven.
https://www.facebook.com/inuittattoorevitalization/
und wer die motiven aus beiden kulturen vergleicht, wird dabei etwas erstaunliches feststellen.

ja. das ist eine frage die nicht einfach zu beantworten ist : 8)
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Ani Ta » 13.04.2017 6:07

Ich sehe auch eine gewisse Ähnlichkeit mit den isländischen Galdrastafir, wie siehst Du das, Branislav?
Benutzeravatar
Ani Ta
 
Beiträge: 887
Registriert: 30.03.2015 6:53
Wohnort: Schweiz

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 14.04.2017 12:48

stimmt. die isländer haben eine ganze reihe von ehnlichen simbolen oder magischen zeichen.

http://www.galdrasyning.is/index.php?op ... itstart=10
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Ani Ta » 14.04.2017 14:35

Jupp, sehs täglich an meinem eigenen Vegvisir, wobei der Ægishjálmur noch viel treffender ist.

Interessant wäre es zu wissen, ob diese Ähnlichkeiten purer Zufall oder einem gemeinsamen Ursprung geschuldet sind.
Benutzeravatar
Ani Ta
 
Beiträge: 887
Registriert: 30.03.2015 6:53
Wohnort: Schweiz

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 15.04.2017 0:30

eines ist klar, die menschen visualisieren gern durch einfache geometrische formen.
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Re: Historische und traditionelle Tattoos

Beitragvon Branislav K. » 08.04.2018 12:14

Ancient Ink: The Archaeology of Tattooing
herausgegeben von Lars Krutak,Aaron Deter-Wolf

https://books.google.de/books?id=RKZGDw ... ng&f=false
Benutzeravatar
Branislav K.
 
Beiträge: 756
Registriert: 10.09.2013 21:55

Vorherige

Zurück zu Literatur und andere Medien

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 0 Gäste